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  • California highway reopens 2 weeks after mudslides
    Traffic began moving again on U.S. 101 in Santa Barbara County shortly after noon
  • 18-month-old boy found safe after father allegedly shoots, kills mother
    The boy at the center of an Amber Alert has been found safe in Guadalupe County, Texas
  • Kabul Intercontinental Hotel attack leaves at least 19 dead
    At least four gunmen launched an attack, according to Afghan officials
  • FTN: Page 2
    Miss the second half of the show? The latest on the government shutdown, the immigration debate, and more
  • CIA chief says shutdown won't affect spy agency's work
    "CBS This Morning" co-host Norah O'Donnell spoke to C.I.A. director Mike Pompeo and his wife, Susan Pompeo
  • Calendar: Week of January 22
    From Oscar nominations to the unveiling of NASA's new manned spacecraft, "Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead
  • Dawn Turner on how disquieting noise can be
    The journalist and author says the noise and racket of modern life are coming in loud and clear
  • 1/21: Ryan, Mulvaney, Durbin
    This week on "Face the Nation," Moderator John Dickerson interviews White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, House Speaker Paul Ryan, and Senator Dick Durbin about the government shutdown. Plus, our political panel breaks down the consequences of the shutdown for both parties.
  • Nature: Alligators
    We leave you this Sunday Morning at Myakka River State Park in Sarasota, Florida. Watch out for 'gators! Videographer: David Bhagat
  • Calendar: Week of January 22
    From Oscar nominations to the unveiling of the next generation of manned spacecraft, "Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.
  • Quiet, please! Dawn Turner on the racket of modern life
    Twenty years ago, journalist Dawn Turner moved to a house in the country. Now she's back in the city, and has discovered how disquieting noise can be. Is it misophonia (a brain anomaly that explains why some people have an incredibly heightened sensitivity to certain sounds)? Or are city sounds just too darn much?
  • Eternal lunch date
    For years, retired mechanic Clarence Purvis had lunch with his wife six days a week at a restaurant in Reidsville, Ga. She remains his ever-present lunch date even though she died four years ago. Steve Hartman reports on the deepest of loves.
  • Welcome to Goat Yoga
    What's cuter than a baby farm animal? How about a baby farm animal joining in a yoga class? The latest craze adds a new element to a yoga routine
  • Goat Yoga, the latest craze
    What's cuter than a baby farm animal? How about a baby farm animal joining in a yoga class? Luke Burbank ventures to a class where joy means a new element added to a yoga routine: tiny goats. He also explores how goats have been taking over social media.
  • Art from behind the walls of Guantanamo
    The exhibition "Ode to the Sea" showcases artwork by terrorism suspects who have been detained at the military prison
  • Guantanamo detainee art
    "Ode to the Sea," an exhibition at New York's John Jay College of Criminal Justice, might look like an ordinary art show, except for the fact that the artists are men who have been detained at the military prison at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba. Tony Dokoupil talks with the show's co-curator, and with the parents of people who lost their lives on 9/11, about art that speaks to freedom beyond prison walls.
  • Almanac: The DeLorean
    On January 21, 1981, the first DeLorean DMC-12, with its striking gull-wing doors, rolled off the production line. It would be one of only 9,000 made. But how many others cars got to travel back in time? Jane Pauley reports.
  • Women's marches continue around the globe for second day
    More demonstrations in support of female empowerment are planned around the world Sunday following Saturday's massive protests
  • A war of words on college campuses
    Free speech and debate are under fire at educational institutions, where students have protested controversial speakers on the right and the left
  • War over free speech on campus
    Rita Braver reports on the war on words at college campuses, where protests of deliberately provocative figures, like white supremacists, have extended to lecturers reporting on academic research; and on the backlash over requirements to provide "safe spaces" and "trigger warnings" to protect students. University of Chicago president Robert Zimmer, who has advocated against such measures, says, "Discomfort is an intrinsic part of an education."

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