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Henderson Police Wrap Up Another Driving Safety Enforcement

HENDERSON, NV (KXNT) – Police in Henderson just finished a week-long safety enforcement campaign, where they tried to put the brakes on speeders and unruly drivers in the Henderson area.

This is what’s called “Joining Forces” campaign, and it’s the 18th the Henderson Police Department has had in 2017.

Keeping Henderson roads safe is everyone’s responsibility, whether you are traveling by foot, bicycle, motorcycle or car. In an effort to make the roads safer, Henderson Police used saturation patrols for enhanced enforcement of traffic laws involving pedestrians during the most recent statewide Joining Forces initiative that ran from August 7-14.

During that period, Henderson Police stopped 424 cars and handed out 387 tickets for various violations, including 318 citations for speeding violations, nine tickets for running red lights, five tickets for cell phone violations and one ticket for a pedestrian being at fault.

In Nevada, 80 pedestrians died in accidents involving motor vehicles in 2016, according to Nevada Department of Public Safety.

The Henderson Police Department received $203,324.68 in federal funding through the Nevada Department of Public Safety-Office of Traffic Safety for the 2017 Joining Forces program. The grant provides funding for enforcement and education to reduce deaths and injuries on Nevada roadways.

Comments

One Comment

  1. James Walker says:

    Remember that the vast majority of speeding tickets go to safe drivers in speed traps where the posted limits are improperly, less-safely, and deliberately posted 10 or more mph below the safest 85th percentile speeds of free flowing traffic under good conditions. Example: If the slowest 85% of the cars are at or under 45 mph in good conditions, then the safest limit to post is 45 mph – NOT 40 or 35 or 30 or lower. You will find heavy speed enforcement in such a place ONLY if the limit is deliberately, improperly, and less safely set at 35 or lower to create a lucrative speed trap.

    James C. Walker, National Motorists Association

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