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Study: Women With Wide Hips More Likely To Have One Night Stands

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A study suggests that women with wider hips are aware they will have a less difficult time giving birth and are therefore more comfortable having sex. (AFP/Getty Images)

A study suggests that women with wider hips are aware they will have a less difficult time giving birth and are therefore more comfortable having sex. (AFP/Getty Images)

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LONDON (CBS Las Vegas) – Las Vegas is well known as a place to visit for a one night stand. Now a controversial study is claiming women with wider hips are more likely to take part in such scandalous behavior.

The study purports that women with wide hips have more sexual partners, and British researchers suggest that it’s because those women know they will have an easier time giving birth and therefore are more likely to be promiscuous.

But anthropologists are casting doubt on the study, arguing the measurements used are not good indicators of whether a woman will have difficulty giving birth, reports LiveScience.

Researchers at the University of Leeds recruited women between 18 and 26 years of age. They measured the distance between each woman’s iliac crests, the bony part of the hips that can be felt on the front of the body.

Then they asked the women to fill out questionnaires about their sexual history.

“What we found is that women that had narrow hips had fewer sexual partners, and most of those were within the context of a relationship,” said Colin Hendrie, lead author of the study.

While the women with hips more than 14 inches across had about the same number of sexual relationships, they reported having more one-night stands and hookups in their pasts.

The scientists concluded that women with wider hips might subconsciously know that childbirth is less risky for them and be “a lot more relaxed in their social behavior,” said Hendrie.

But critics of the study say the research was flawed. “In order for this to really be supported, somebody has got to test this same kind of thing in a lot of populations,” said Wenda Trevathan, a biological anthropologist at New Mexico State University, who was not involved with the study.

The study is published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior.

(TM and © Copyright 2014 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2014 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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