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Study: Erectile Dysfunction Meds Don’t Help Relationships, Increase Happiness

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File photo of pills. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

File photo of pills. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (CBS Las Vegas) – The Mayo Clinic, with offices in Scottsdale, Ariz., defines erectile dysfunction as a condition that “occurs when a man can no longer get or keep an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse.”

“Having erection trouble from time to time isn’t necessarily a cause for concern,” officials note on the Clinic’s website. “But if erectile dysfunction is an ongoing problem, it may cause stress, cause relationship problems or affect your self-confidence.”

A new study suggests that treating erectile dysfunction may not have much of a positive impact on the relationships of those who suffer from it, however.

Rather, its findings – which were published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine earlier this month, according to LiveScience – indicate that treating impotence medically had no effect on a given patient’s relationship or overall life satisfaction.

Information on the participants in the study regarding their levels of satisfaction and happiness with their relationships and lives overall, as well as their levels of self-confidence and sexual satisfaction, was collected by the researchers coordinating it. Levels were chronicled both before and after participating patients received treatment for erectile dysfunction.

Though improvements were documented in the latter categories after treatment, men indicated to researchers that there were not significant changes in the former ones.

“Treatments that target both physical and psychosocial aspects of ED are likely to be the most effective treatments for men with ED,” the researchers additionally noted in their study.

Experts in the field who were not a part of the study, including Dr. Andrew Kramer, a urologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center, were all the same supportive of calling awareness to the fact that prescribing PDE5 inhibitors for impotence is not a cure-all for the mental and psychological issues a person may grapple with in their relationships and life.

“It’s simplistic to think that fixing an erection issue would solve relationship issues,” he was quoted as saying. “Happiness is very complicated, and erections are just one small piece of it.”

LiveScience learned that about 20 percent of men in the United States are affected by erectile dysfunction.

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