News

Study: People Who Stray From Gender Roles In Bed Have Better Sex

View Comments
File photo of a couple kissing. (Photo by Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images)

File photo of a couple kissing. (Photo by Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images)

CBS Las Vegas (con't)

Affordable Care Act Updates: CBSLasVegas.com/ACA

Health News & Information: CBSLasVegas.com/Health

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up

LAS VEGAS (CBS Las Vegas) – New research suggests that men and women who break free of gender stereotypes in the bedroom will have better sex lives than those who do not.

A study published at the end of September in the journal Sex Roles refutes the assumption that men should always take charge during sex. Those that approached trysts in such a fashion allegedly felt less confident and were not as open-minded to the concept of female condoms, LiveScience reports.

Lisa Rosenthal and a team of researchers based at Yale University asked 357 heterosexual women and 126 heterosexual men, all sexually active and between the ages of 18 and 29, to complete a survey about their sex lives.

Participants were asked about assertiveness in getting satisfaction for themselves, their overall sexual confidence, and their use of condoms and other precautionary methods that promote safe sex.

According to LiveScience, participants were asked to rate their level of agreement with statements such as, “It’s [okay] if some groups have more of a chance in life than others,” to gauge his or her views of social hierarchies and disparities in equality between social groups.

In addition to the survey, a bowl of free condoms was left in the area where questions were answered, for participants to take or leave samples as they so desired.

What the surveys reportedly dictated was that those who subscribed to antiquated gender roles also thought that men should be the dominant party when it came to sex.

“If men believe that men should dominate sexually, this may prevent them from feeling open or comfortable discussing sexual behavior and protection with their partners or asking questions about things they may not know,” researchers were quoted as noting by LiveScience.

Additionally, those who felt that way were far less likely to take a female condom from the bowl of samples provided for them.

The study noted, “For both women and men, the belief that men should dominate sexually could reduce interest in female condoms, because female condoms are meant to be a woman-centered source of protection and may be seen as violating the norm or belief that men should be in control of sexual situations.”

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,079 other followers